Joss Whedon’s dilemma of feminism

 On November 4rth 2013, actor and creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Joss Whedon stands up on stage of Equality Now at Montage hotel in Los Angeles, California as he is about to be doubted and change a lot of peoples minds or get a lot of enemies. Whedon states that feminism or the idea that men and women have equal rights, is not a natural state.”I hate ‘feminist. Not feminists, but the word “feminist.” It’s harsh and Germanic. It hisses. Feminisssst. But it’s not just the noise. It’s that the “ist” includes the idea that equality, that feminism is not a natural state. I hope I’m being clear, I didn’t say I hate feminists, that would be weird,” he continued. “I said I hate feminist. I’m talking about the word.”

 

1.78 meters tall, 49 years old, slightly bald, mustache, beard and ginger.
Joseph Hill or “Joss Whedon” born June 23 1964 is an american actor, screenwriter, film and television producer as well as a seeker for equality. He was born in New York City and is the son of Tom Whedon, a screenwriter as well. His mother, Lee Stearns taught history, a novelist and specially a feminist who inspired the organization “Equality now.” His mother’s words of passion and independency upon women inspired Joss. In all of his work he included strong female characters in his books. Whedon identifies himself as an atheist. He confirms this by answering questions that are identified with religion many times such as “Is there a God?” which he responds with “No.” Politically, he spoke about Socialism and Capitalism, stating that “Ultimately all these systems don’t work.” and that America is turning “into a Tsarist Russia.” Joss has 2 children and his spouse is Kai Cole. “I spent a ton of time alone. I was raised by a feminist, I had a terrifying father, and oppressively scary and mean brothers. We had a farm. The rule was between breakfast and lunch you weren’t allowed to make a sound. “Quiet time” is what we called it, because my mom was writing. So what are you doing? You’re either writing, or you’re eating, or you’re walking up and down your driveway creating giant science-fiction universes and various elaborate vengeance schemes upon your brothers. At our apartment in New York, I’d stay in my room and listen to [Star Wars composer] John Williams and make up stories. I was afraid because every time I went outside in Manhattan, I got mugged. I remember being in my room and going, “Oh, I’m alone, but not lonesome. I have a family. They are people. But I’m all alone.” For me, that’s a defining trait.”

 

Meryl Streep stands up on stage at Equality Now to briefly introduce Joss Whedon as you can hear the sounds of clicking and taking photographs. At Equality now, Joss nervously goes on stage and looks at the ground saying the following “Thank you,” he coughs “I wouldn’t have come here if they would have introduced me like that.” He giggles as the public laughs warmly. He starts of later going in the topic about one of the things he gets most asked of. Joss now stands up firmly and asks as a reporter asking him the following question “Why do you create such strong female characters in his book?” and to what he responds with “My mother inspired me too, she was a very strong feminist and my dad and grandad because the always prized wit in all the women they were with.” Continuously he talks about what bothers him about feminism “”I hate ‘feminist. Not feminists, but the word “feminist.” It’s harsh and Germanic. It hisses. Feminisssst. But it’s not just the noise. It’s that the “ist” includes the idea that equality, that feminism is not a natural state. I hope I’m being clear, I didn’t say I hate feminists, that would be weird,” he continued. “I said I hate feminist. I’m talking about the word.”

Although he was not the first person to make the claim, woman everywhere, specially feminists doubted him, hated him and made very quick or very well thought of judgements of him. ”In the other hand, a lot of women or “feminists” had agreed with him and a feminists mind had completely gone upside down. He even points out Katy Perry for being believing that she doesn’t believe in the word feminist. So Whedon is somewhat right because he says that equality is something that you are not to doubt about, that it is something we all know, that everyone understands. Therefore, the fact that it’s an “Ist” concludes that it is not a natural state, that it is something you need to “develop or stand up for” it’s as if we’re contradicting ourselves saying what we are is not a natural state. But Joss is missing something, that is why feminists are feminists, and it’s why we have the name. Social, political and economic equality is not the backslide. Saying that equality is natural sounds like a good thing but Joss uses it to ignore the entire history of feminism.  All these feminists that Whedon doesn’t talk about have fought in exhausting battles for women’s freedom. The word feminist is not a condition or something you believe in but it is a movement. It’s hope and faith for a change. “Feminism has fought no wars. It has killed no opponents. It has set up no concentration camps, starved no enemies, practiced no cruelties.

Its battles have been for education, for the vote, for better working conditions…for safety on the streets…for child care, for social welfare…for rape crisis centers, women’s refuges, reforms in the law.

If someone says, “Oh, I’m not a feminist,” I ask, “Why, what’s your problem?”

Dale Spender.

Whedon doesn’t seem to understand or include that our society was not born equal, that we were born and raised thinking men are superior, men cannot cry, men cannot show their feelings, women are weak and sensitive and just to stay at home or be a sex toy. Feminism is for standing up and breaking that, we’re changing not trying to just empower women but also give fairness to men everywhere.

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